Thursday 30th of June 2016 05:03:52 AM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
the first few elements!

In addition, if the document is scrolled, the paragraph will scrollright along with it. This is because the element's containingblock is the BODY element's content area,not the viewport. If you want to position elements so thatthey're placed relative to the viewport and don't scrollalong with the rest of the document, then the next section is foryou.

A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

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element's content, and the left and right margins. The left andright padding and borders must be set to specific values, or elsethey default to a width of zero (again, assuming noborder-style is declared; if one has been set,then the width of the borders is set to be the vaguely defined valuemedium ). Figure 8-10 provides ahandy illustration for remembering which parts of the box can take avalue of auto, and which cannot.

Figure 8-10

Figure 8-10. Horizontal properties that can be set to auto

case in
Figure 7-83). Therefore, you should always define a backup list-style-type for the list:

UL LI {list-style-image: url(ohio.bmp); list-style-type: square;}
Figure 7-83

Figure 7-83. Providing fallbacks for unusable images

The other thing you can do with list-style-image is set it to the default value of none. This is good practice because list-style-image is inherited -- so any nested lists will pick up the image as the bullet, unless you prevent this from happening:of this are shown in Figure 8-31.

Figure 8-31

Figure 8-31. Keeping floats from overlapping

The advantage of this rule is that, since you don't have toworry about one floated element obscuring another, you can be assuredthat all of your floated content will be visible. This makes floatinga fairly safe thing to do. The situation is markedly different whenusing positioning, where it is very easy to cause elements tooverwrite one another.