Sunday 29th of May 2016 07:07:36 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects,

heightIE4 Y/Y IE5 Y/Y NN4 N/N Op3 Y/-

This is usedto set the height of an element. Height is most often applied toimages, but can be used on any block-level or replaced element,although support for such behavior is not widespread as of thiswriting. Negative length values are not permitted.

d to set the amount of whitespacebetween letters. A letter is defined as any displayed character,including numbers, symbols, and other font glyphs. Length values are along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity
XML parsers allow you to code faster by giving you a parser for your all your XML documents (with and without DTDs).

XML documents are easily committed to a persistence layer

XML documents may be stored in files or databases. When stored in files, XML documents are simply plain text files with tags (and possibly DTDs). It is very easy to save your XML documents to a text file and pass the text file around to other machines, platforms and programs (as long as they can understand the data). In the worst case scenario, XML documents (files) can be viewed in a text editor on just about any platform.

XML documents are also naturally committed to a database (relational or object) or any other kind of XML document store. There are commercial products available which allow you to save XML documents to an XML storage layer (which is not a database per se), like Datachannel's XStore and ODI's eXcelon. These XML store solutions are quite expensive ($10,000 to $20,000 range).

easy way to avoid this.

Sometimes,the values you're entering for margin get a little repetitive:

You don't have to keep typing in pairs of numbers like this, though. Instead of the preceding markup, try this:

These two values are enough to take the place of four. But how?

CSS defines a few steps to accommodate fewer than four values for

Figure 6-20

Figure 6-20. The results of a more sophisticated style sheet

This is but the tiniest beginning of what's possible, ofcourse. By all means, try some examples of your own!

6.1.4. Good Practices

want to use as the containing block for the absolutely positionedelement, and give it a position ofrelative with no offsets. Thus:

P.contain {position: relative;}

Consider the example in Figure 9-19. It shows twoparagraphs that contain identical text. However, the first paragraphcontains an inline boldface element, and the second an absolutelypositioned boldface element. In the second paragraph, the styles usedwould be something like what is shown here: IMG {vertical-align: 50%;} <P>The image in this paragraph <IMG SRC="test.gif" ALT="test image"> will be raised 9px.</P>

The inherited value of line-height is what causes the image to be raised nine pixels, instead of some other number. Without a value for line-height, it wouldn't be possible to perform percentage-value vertical alignments. The height of the image itself has no relevance when it comes to vertical alignment: the value of line-height is all that matters.