Thursday 24th of April 2014 07:49:23 AM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity
element.

Similar to rules 4 and 5, this further limits the upward floating ofan element by preventing it from being above the top of a linecontaining content that precedes the floated element. Let's saythat, right in the middle of a paragraph, there is a floated image.The highest the top of that image may be placed is the top of theline box from which the image originates. As you can see in Figure 8-35, this keeps images from floating too farupward.

case, the element is not displayed and is removed from the documentaltogether so that it doesn't have any effect on documentlayout. Figure 9-14 shows a document in which anEM element has been set to behidden, based on the following styles and markup:

EM.trans {visibility: hidden; border: 3px solid gray; background: silver;padding: 1em;}<P>This is a paragraph which should be visible. Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet,XML parsers allow you to code faster by giving you a parser for your all your XML documents (with and without DTDs).

XML documents are easily committed to a persistence layer

XML documents may be stored in files or databases. When stored in files, XML documents are simply plain text files with tags (and possibly DTDs). It is very easy to save your XML documents to a text file and pass the text file around to other machines, platforms and programs (as long as they can understand the data). In the worst case scenario, XML documents (files) can be viewed in a text editor on just about any platform.

XML documents are also naturally committed to a database (relational or object) or any other kind of XML document store. There are commercial products available which allow you to save XML documents to an XML storage layer (which is not a database per se), like Datachannel's XStore and ODI's eXcelon. These XML store solutions are quite expensive ($10,000 to $20,000 range).