Thursday 23rd of October 2014 07:08:39 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

Figure 8-53

Figure 8-53. Changing the vertical alignment of the larger text

Here, the middle of the boldfaced text's inline box has linedup with the middle of the inline boxes of the other text in the line.Because the inline boxes are all 12px tall, and their middles are alllined up, this means that the line box for this line is now only 12pixels high, just like the others. However, it also means that theoversized text intrudes into other lines even more than before.

Let's consider another situation where another inline elementis in the same line as the boldfaced text, but its alignment is other link popularity

interpret them as if the decimal wasn't there, which would leadthem to think the preceding value is actuallyrgb(255%,40%,986%). In that case, assuming theuser agent behaves correctly, the out-of-range values will be"clipped" to the nearest legal value -- in this case,100%. Thus, a user agent which ignores the decimalpoints should act as if the declared value isrgb(100%,40%,100%). Whether it does so is, ofcourse, another story altogether. Also, negative valuesaren't allowed, so any value set to be less than

As we can see in Figure 7-41, despite the fact that the border's width was set to be 20px , when the style is set to none, not only does the border's style go away, so does its width! Why?

If you'll remember, the terminology used in the previous section was that a border with a style of none does not exist. Those words were picked carefully because they help explain what's going on here. Since the border doesn't exist, it can't have any width, so the width is automatically