Monday 22nd of December 2014 02:26:53 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

of these isused to set the width on a specific border side, of course, just aswith the margin properties.

border-width

Values

[ thin | medium |

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity
- 50 = 400. Even though this leads to a child elementsticking out of its parent, technically the specificationhasn't been violated, because the values of the sevenproperties add up to the required total. It's a semantic dodge,but it's valid behavior.

Let's consider another example, illustrated in Figure 8-20, where the left margin is set to be negative:

DIV {width: 400px; border: 1px solid black;}P.wide {margin-left: -50px; width: auto; margin-right: 10px;
format that some user agents might not be able to display (as is thecase in Figure 7-83). Therefore, you should alwaysdefine a backup list-style-type for the list:

UL LI {list-style-image: url(ohio.bmp); list-style-type: square;}
Figure 7-83

Figure 7-83. Providing fallbacks for unusable images

The other thing you can do with list-style-imageis set it to the default value of none. This isgood practice because list-style-image isinherited -- so any nested lists will pick up the image as theINPUT[type="checkbox"] {color: #666666;}<INPUT TYPE="radio" NAME="r2" VALUE="A "><INPUT TYPE="checkbox" NAME="c3" VALUE="one ">

This allows you to dispense with the classes altogether, at least inthis instance. See the Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead", for more detailson how this kind of selector works.

WARNING

Navigator 4 does not apply colors to form elements, but setting thecolors for form elements does work in Internet Explorer 4 and 5, and