Friday 22nd of September 2017 05:07:30 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity
position the image relative to the current line only, and do not wrap otherlines: 
TOP aligns top of image to highest element in the line. 
TEXTTOP aligns top of image with highest text in theline. 
MIDDLE aligns middle of image to baseline. 
ABSMIDDLE aligns middle of image with middle of largestelement in the line. 
BOTTOM aligns bottom of image to bottom of text. 
ABSBOTTOM aligns bottom of image with bottom of largest

P.one {font-weight: bold;}
Figure 5-9

Figure 5-9. Inherited font weight

This isn't unusual, but the situation gets interesting when you use the last two values we have to discuss: bolder and lighter. In general terms, these keywords have the effect you'd anticipate: they make text more or less bold with comparison to its parent's font weight. Let's consider bolder first. bullet's position is set to outside, it will appear the way list items always have on the Web, as you can see in Figure 7-85:

LI {list-style-position: outside;}
Figure 7-85

Figure 7-85. Placing the bullets outside list items

Should you desire a slightly different appearance, though, you can pull the bullet in toward the content by setting the value to be inside:

required to fully support negative margins, using the phrase,"A negative value is allowed, but there may beimplementation-specific limits." In the world of web browsers,though Navigator 4.x, Explorer 4.x/5.x, and Opera 3.x do permitnegative margins:

Negative margins have an impact on vertical formatting, affecting howmargins are collapsed. If there are negative vertical margins, thenthe browser should take the absolute