Friday 31st of July 2015 11:21:03 AM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?

list-style

Values

<list-style-type> || <list-style-image> || <list-style-position>

Figure 7-87

Figure 7-87. Bringing it all together

The values for list-style can be listed in any

A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity

The result shown in Figure 7-35 wouldn't bewhat the author had in mind, of course, but it's technicallycorrect. So long as none andsolid are supported, and any other legal valuesare interpreted as solid, that's enough tobe CSS1-compliant. Accordingly, even though Navigator 4.x fails torender dashed and dottedborders, since it does render them as solid,it's not behaving badly.

so margin-left is forced to be auto, not margin-right. This is not so much an issue under CSS1 as it is in CSS2, which introduces properties related to writing direction.

If both margins are set explicitly, and width is auto, then the value of width will be set to be whatever is needed to reach the required total (that is, the content width of the parent element). The following not the viewport. If you want to position elements so that they're placed relative to the viewport and don't scroll along with the rest of the document, then the next section is for you.

Before we get there, however, there are a few more things to cover. Remember that absolutely positioned boxes can have backgrounds, margins, borders, and padding; styles can be applied within them, just as with any other element. This can make them very useful for the creation of sidebars, "sticky

8.2.2.3. More than one auto

Now let us consider the cases where two of these three properties areset to auto. If both the margins are set toauto, then they are set to equal lengths, thuscentering the element within its parent, as you can see from Figure 8-14: