Figure 8-31

Figure 8-31. Keeping floats from overlapping

The advantage of this rule is that, since you don't have toworry about one floated element obscuring another, you can be assuredthat all of your floated content will be visible. This makes floatinga fairly safe thing to do. The situation is markedly different whenusing positioning, where it is very easy to cause elements tooverwrite one another.

3. The right outer edge of a left-floating element may notbe to the right of the left outer edge of any right-floating element

Wednesday 27th of July 2016 05:16:40 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity
into ways of achieving a similar effect with CSS a little later inthis chapter.)

vertical-align:text-bottom refers to thebottom of the text in the line. Replaced elements, or indeed nontextelements of any kind, are ignored for the purposes of this value.Instead, a "default" text box is considered. This defaultbox is derived from the font-size of the parentelement. The bottom of the aligned element's inline box is thenAnd, just to top things off, Navigator doesn't handle padding very well, so the previous example would result in a small amount of blank space between the content box and the borders. Altogether, it isn't a very pretty picture.

6.1.3. Special Effects

Let's return to the happier realm

Applies to

all elements

WARNING

Percentage values refer to the width of the parent element.

collapsed and uncollapsed margins.

Figure 7-16

Figure 7-16. Collapsed versus uncollapsed margins

Correctly implemented user agents will collapse the vertically adjacent margins, as shown in the first list in Figure 7-16, where there are 15-pixel spaces between each list item. The second list shows what would happen if the user agent didn't collapse margins, resulting in 25-pixel spaces between list items.

Another word to use, if you don't like "collapse,"