Wednesday 18th of January 2017 12:21:09 AM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

like the ability to set different margins with multiple values. All the same rules about value replication apply to border styles, just as they did with margins and padding. Thus, the following two statements would have the same effect, as depicted in Figure 7-34:

P.new1 {border-style: solid dashed none;}
P.new2 {border-style: solid dashed none dashed;}
XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity

There are advantages and disadvantages to using some of the strategies to import and export XML. The complexity of your application data and available system resources are factors that would determine what strategy should be used.

Client and Server side - Application Servers

The 2nd category of Java applications called Java Application Servers (or app servers) and they make good use of XML. Unlike client side graphical Java apps (from the previous section) which are very standalone in their operations, app servers tie many different networked software components together in order to provide information from multiple sources to a set of client side Java apps or web browsers (maybe even running on different devices). This is shown in Figure 2. An app server is actually a conglomeration of several distributed and client/server software systems. So when you write an app server, you are actually writing many different software systems which are all networked to work together, to process information that comes from various sources, and distribute this information to a set of client apps (that you also have to write) running on different devices and platforms.

Explorer 4.x for Windows does.

Also, you must have the final version of Explorer 4.x for this towork -- so if you're still using a preview release,you'll need to upgrade it, which is probably a good ideaanyway. (Thanks to Howard Marvel for discovering and sharing thistrick.)

8.2.2.3. More than one auto

Now let us consider the cases where two of these three properties are set to auto. If both the margins are set to auto, then they are set to equal lengths, thus centering the element within its parent, as you can see from Figure 8-14:

P {width: 100px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;}
Figure 8-14

Figure 8-14. Setting an explicit width

This is the correct way to center block-level elements, as a matter

Thus, for each bit of text where both the font-size and line-height are 12px , nothing is applied to the content-height (since 12 minus 12 equals zero, and half of nothing is nothing), and so the inline box is 12px high. For the boldfaced text, however, the difference between font-size and line-height is 12px . This is divided in half to determine the half-leading (6px), and the half-leading is subtracted from both the top and bottom of the content-height to arrive at an inline